Kimchi

Photography by Angie Norwood Browne

1 medium head napa cabbage
1/4 cup sea salt or kosher salt
Water
1 tablespoon grated garlic (5 to 6 cloves)
1 teaspoon grated ginger
1 teaspoon sugar
2 to 3 tablespoons seafood flavor or water
1 to 5 tablespoons Korean red pepper flakes
8 ounces Korean radish or daikon, peeled and cut into matchsticks
4 scallions, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces

  1. Slice the cabbage: Cut the cabbage lengthwise into quarters and remove the cores. Cut each quarter crosswise into 2-inch-wide strips.
  2. Salt the cabbage: Place the cabbage and salt in a large bowl. Using your hands, massage the salt into the cabbage until it starts to soften a bit, then add water to cover the cabbage. Put a plate on top and weigh it down with something heavy, like a jar or can of beans. Let stand for 1 to 2 hours.
  3. Rinse and drain the cabbage: Rinse the cabbage under cold water 3 times and drain in a colander for 15 to 20 minutes. Rinse and dry the bowl you used for salting, and set it aside to use in step 5.
  4. Make the paste: Meanwhile, combine the garlic, ginger, sugar, and seafood flavor (or 3 tablespoons water) in a small bowl and mix to form a smooth paste. Mix in the gochugaru, using 1 tablespoon for mild and up to 5 tablespoons for spicy.
  5. Combine the vegetables and paste: Gently squeeze any remaining water from the cabbage and return it to the bowl along with the radish, scallions, and seasoning paste.
  6. Mix thoroughly: Using your hands, gently work the paste into the vegetables until they are thoroughly coated.
  7. Pack the kimchi into the jar: Pack the kimchi into the jar, pressing down on it until the brine rises to cover the vegetables. Leave at least 1 inch of headspace. Seal the jar with the lid.
  8. Let it ferment: Let the jar stand at room temperature for 1 to 5 days. You may see bubbles inside the jar and brine may seep out of the lid; place a bowl or plate under the jar to help catch any overflow.
  9. Check it daily and refrigerate when ready: Check the kimchi once a day, pressing down on the vegetables with a clean finger or spoon to keep them submerged under the brine. Taste a little at this point.  When the kimchi tastes ripe enough for your liking, transfer the jar to the refrigerator. You may eat it right away, but it’s best after another week or two.

Recipe from “The Kitchn” cookbook

Food Styling by Theresa Gilliam

 

 

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About anbphoto

I never thought I'd start a blog because I'm not a writer. I am a Southern Catholic girl, a commercial food Photographer and an avid gardener. I have always wanted to journal my garden; growing food (fruit, herbs and vegetables), photographing ingredients from earth to plate and sharing the recipes I love. Someone suggested that I forget about all the writing and simply share my photographs and recipes. Perfect! My blog is an exploration of home gardening and cooking, so here is a little history of me and how "Stray Cats and Blackberries" came about. Born and raised in Alabama, my love for food lies in Southern cuisine. I learned early on that life is a party revolving around friends and family sharing food and wine. Backyard Summer bbqs, black eyed peas and collard greens on New Year's Day or ham and chocolate on Easter are just a few favorite Southern traditions I love sharing. I became fascinated with gardening when my husband and I bought our first house. I am a mother, a wife and someone who appreciates the little treasures and traditions in life. My garden started as an empty parking lot behind a Mom & Pop grocery store that my husband and I bought and renovated into a photography studio. While my husband put on his carpenter pants I put on my gardening gloves. Thirteen dumpsters at three tons each and nearly three years later I had a plantable space to sew seeds. I have been a food photographer and gardener for over 20 years and love the idea of merging my passions by growing food, photographing my harvest and sharing recipes with you. Enjoy

One comment

  1. Dorothee Brand

    Love this!!

    On Friday, February 19, 2016, STRAY CATS AND BLACKBERRIES wrote:

    > anbphoto posted: “Photography by Angie Norwood Browne 1 medium head napa > cabbage 1/4 cup sea salt or kosher salt Water 1 tablespoon grated garlic (5 > to 6 cloves) 1 teaspoon grated ginger 1 teaspoon sugar 2 to 3 tablespoons > seafood flavor or water 1 to 5 table” >

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